THREE THINGS TO BE AWARE OF WITH LOW-COST DATA BACKUP SERVICES


I’m always a little surprised by the reaction from customers regarding off-site storage services.  It goes something like, “Well, the price is so good, that I don’t really need to know anything else.”  From a pure accounting standpoint, I do see their point.

As a company goes down the road of evaluating low-cost backup and disaster recovery service providers, they should stop and “read the fine manual” as we say in IT: in this case, it’s the small print contained in the Terms of Service. I’ve looked at more than a few of these agreements and here are three key points that you should keep in mind:

1. Security Is Ultimately Your Responsibility

You’ll often see language in the ToS that says “they take security seriously” and “it’s very important”, but there’s additional legalese that states the providers can’t be held liable for any damages as result of data loss.

In fact, some of the ToS have a clause that explicitly says you are responsible for the security of your account. Yes, they will encrypt the data, and you may be given the option to hold the security keys. In a very strong sense, the security hot potato remains with you even though they have the data. When calculating the true costs and risks of these services, keep that in mind.

2.  Two-Factor Authentication?

As Metadata Era readers, you’re no doubt wondering about two-factor authentication. As a kind of a virtual commercial landlord, these services hold data for lots of businesses, so you might expect building  security would be tight—“show me your badge”.  After all, these backup services are a magnet for hackers.

I didn’t see two-factor authentication listed as a standard part of the packages of the cloud providers I looked at. However, there are third-party services available that can provide out-of-band authentication through a separate logon solution, but at an extra cost.  And you’ll have to contract separately with them.

3.  Data Availability

You store your data in the cloud with these companies, so you’d expect some promise that the data will be there when you need it.  Of course, on the public Intertoobz, there are limits to what they can be responsible for. Typically there are clauses in the ToS that exclude the digital equivalent of acts of nature—e.g., DoS attacks.

Outside unusual events, these back-up services generally don’t even provide a likelihood of availability—99%, 99.9%, or pick your sigma.  And the most they’re liable for when there’s loss of data dialtone is the subscription fee.

This is not to say that you can’t get a better deal—Service Level Agreements (SLAs) that compensate when certain metrics aren’t met—but for low-price, one-size-fits-all bit lockers, there is usually no or limited opportunity to negotiate.

 

If you already have an outsourced data backup or disaster recovery solution in place with a sensible SLA and you can truly estimate the cost savings, and you’re getting a blue-light deal, then more power to you.

However, for everyone else, a good in-house IT department using purchased archiving or transfer solutions can offer custom security solutions and high-availability, along with guaranteed accountability.

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